New Island, Falkland Islands

Wind-swept New Island, one of the world’s most remote inhabited islands, lies on the western fringe of the Falklands Archipelago. Its gentle, low-lying eastern shores are indented with white, sandy bays and coves beaming with turquoise water.  Gradually rising, these slopes are transformed into rugged sea-battered cliffs on the island’s western side. A place of colorful landscapes, New Island supports some of the largest concentrations and diversity of wildlife in the Falklands, with over forty species of nesting birds. Four species of penguins, including 13,000 gentoo and 26,000 Southern rockhopper penguins call the island home. Embracing winds and seas below, 60,000 black-browed albatross soar along the cliffs. 
New Island’s history is as rich and plentiful as its natural wonders. The island has known human presence since the late 1700s, especially with many whaling ships finding refuge in its coves and bays from tempestuous weather.