Seydisfjordur, Iceland

The remote town of Seydisfjordur is perched at the end of a narrow, twisting fjord in East Iceland. A very picturesque village of 700 people, it is known for its thriving arts scene and large number of resident artists. Tourism is on the rise, as well, since its natural setting of mountains and waterfalls is simply breathtaking. Surrounded by impressive, 3,560’ (1,085 m) snow-capped mountains, Seydisfjordur is home to the Technical Museum of Iceland, and the area hosts populations of both eider ducks and Atlantic puffins. Settled by Norwegian fishermen in 1848, the town quickly became an important center for trade between Iceland and Europe. It is known throughout Iceland for its colorful Norwegian-style wooden houses.

 

The first telegraph cable connecting Iceland to Europe made landfall here in 1906. A large dam was constructed nearby in 1913, which produced power for the country’s first high voltage AC power plant, a revolutionary achievement for its time.